Quote of the Day

Published:October 11, 2012 by Brendan Wolfe

Thinking about Gabriel’s Conspiracy in a fictional context, this is from a New Yorker profile of the novelist Hilary Mantel:

Historical fiction is a hybrid form, halfway between fiction and nonfiction. It is pioneer country, without fixed laws. To some, if it is fiction, anything is permitted. To others, wanton invention when facts are to be found, or, worse, contradiction of well-known facts, is a horror: a violation of an implicit contract with the reader, and a betrayal of the people written about. Ironically, it is when those stricter standards of truth are applied that historical fiction looks most like lying.

It is, in some ways, a humble form. There are limits to the writer’s authority. She cannot know her character completely. She has no power to alter his world or postpone his death. But in other ways it is not humble at all: she presumes to know the secrets of the dead and the mechanics of history.

IMAGE: Nat Turner preaches religion (The Granger Collection, New York)